It Seemed Like a Good Idea

The can said, “do not puncture,” but since my free-on hose was not penetrating the can, I thought I would use my ingenuity. The plan was to tap the top with a small nail, then with my cat like quickness, attach the hose, and fill my Toyota’s air conditioner. It sounded like a solid idea, but was I ever wrong. I was not nearly quick enough, nor had I anticipated what would come out of the can. My gentle tap set off Old Faithful. A geyser of air and oil shot out of the can and before I realized what had happened or could get the hose on the now slippery can, I had lost over half its contents. R-134 was everywhere. Thankfully, the lesson only cost me about $5. My experience with a can of R-134 is what sometimes happens when we play with sin. The Bible is filled with caution signs warning us about the power of sin, yet for some reason we disregard its warnings. In the moment sin seems like a good idea, we justify our actions, or think we can handle it, but in the end, to often it turns out like my can of R-134, a bigger mess than we could have ever imagined and costing more than we ever anticipated. David, the man after God’s own heart, was a perfect example of the power of sin. Victorious over a bear, lion and giant, able to deny the temptation to slay his adversary, David peering over his balcony, spots a bathing Bathsheba. His flesh says, you can handle this, you deserve it, while his heart was saying, “warning, danger, stay away.” He justifies he actions, pushes past the warnings, and within days his life is in disarray. The mess was larger than he imagined and cost him more than he anticipated. What warning signs are you ignoring? Stop now! Listen to God’s promptings, don’t mess with sin.

Run Your Race

I was 10 and in the fifth grade. Hurdles were a big deal to me. With long legs, speed, and tenacity I somehow managed to win the hurdles race at my school. With the win, I got to go to the high school track. I remember thinking, “how in the world did I get here”. I don’t remember if I won in my age group, but I do remember advancing and feeling proud to run the hurdle race for my school. Years later my daughter Risa decided to run hurdles at her school also, I was proud that she wanted to compete in the same race I did. It takes courage to run hurdles. Each jump must be perfect; you are always hoping you don’t trip and land on your face. Watching the summer Olympics, I gasped when a young lady who had worked her entire life to have an opportunity to be in the Olympics, crashed as she jumped the first hurdle. I understood her pain, though I can’t imagine the anguish she felt to do it on a world stage. She had worked hard and made it to the Olympics and though painful to fall, she should stand proud of the fact she had raced. In the race of life, we need to remember all of us have been chosen to run. We must never lose our tenacity, courage to run and our desire to conquer every hurdle that is put in our path. We were created to compete and although there will be times we may fall, trip and skin our knees, we must get up and keep running. All of us that stay in the race will win because Jesus promised He was going to prepare a place for those who finish the race. So, run and never give up. Jesus is cheering for you!

-Mary Hudson