Dormant, Not Dead

grassYour yard. 90 degrees. No rain. Add it all together and it’s the recipe for a drought. Just so you know, it’s not dead, it’s dormant. Brown grass doesn’t indicate dead grass but surviving grass. The brown color lets you know that your grass is aware that there’s too much heat and not enough water. It gives up its color, forgets about its appearance and protects its roots. It’s taking all the water and protecting its life source. What is true of our yards is true when it comes to times of drought in our spiritual life. There are seasons when life gets hot, our souls get dry and we feel spiritually dehydrated. What do we do? Protect the roots. It’s during these times when the best thing you can do is draw near to God, soak in His presence and feed on His Word. You may have seasons when your joy feels exhausted and your worship feels empty, but don’t be too concerned. Even though it may appear bad or feel empty, have confidence that the same God that brought the rain is surrounding you in the dry times. Did you know that when managed properly, a drought is good for grass? Drought kills off weeds, strengthens the roots and when the rains come and the seasons change, makes the grass stronger. While we don’t like spiritual droughts, they strengthen our faith, give us a fresh view of God and make us stronger for the good times. In a dry time? Be encouraged, God’s got you.

 

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